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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Tuesday, July 29, 2014

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The second hole at Coldwater Canyon. The front nine is one of the oldest designs in the state.
The second hole at Coldwater Canyon. The front nine is one of the oldest designs in the state. (Photo: Chula Vista Resort)

Coldwater Canyon a golfer's treat

WISCONSIN DELLS – There is plenty of great golf to take advantage of in Wisconsin Dells, especially championship-caliber venues that can stretch your mental and physical abilities, but Coldwater Canyon – now part of the Chula Vista Resort – is a must play for travelers and residents alike.

The front nine was built 91 years ago as a daily fee course, and when the back nine was added nearly a decade ago, it had yet to be absorbed into the resort. Once it was, it didn't lose its attraction as a "local" golf course and it offers those staying on the grounds a different feel than typical "resort" golf.

Just looking at the scorecard, a player might lick their chops. The course is short (less than 5,700 yards, but some new tee boxes will push it over 6,000 next year) but you need to control your tee shots. And on the front nine, you also need to be able to shape them in order to have excellent approaches into contoured greens that are more slippery than you'd expect.

You can definitely post a career-best round there, which can be exciting, but you can also walk off the 18th green shaking your head, wondering how in the heck you posted the high numbers that you did.

But that's what makes Coldwater Canyon such a gem.

There are no tricks, and no surprises. It's all out in front of you, offers some room to recover, but it can beat you down if you make bad decisions.

What also makes Coldwater Canyon a treat for a resort player is that front nine, built along its namesake. It stands on its own, so if you've only got a couple hours to kill while the kids nap or the spouse hits the spa or water park, it's worth a spin.

Off the course, a full driving range with grass tees is available to you, which is an underrated part of the resort experience. It gives you a chance to shake off the cobwebs built up on the swing (or from the night before), and there is a green to chip and putt on as well.

New PGA professional and Director of Golf Jason Boaz will welcome you, along …

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Jordan Zimmermann hasn't been in the major leagues long, but he's on our all-time team.
Jordan Zimmermann hasn't been in the major leagues long, but he's on our all-time team. (Photo: David Bernacchi)

I'm coming home: Wisconsin's all-time nine

"I'm coming home." LeBron James rocked the sports world with those three simple words. It got us thinking -- what if all of Wisconsin's baseball players did the same thing?

Then we realized, wait, there aren't enough active players left to field a full squad. So, we made an all-time team of players born in Wisconsin.

It'd be kind of a zombie squad at this point, but a good one nonetheless, even with some fan favorites and familiar names left off the starting nine.

Did we get it right?

Let us know on Twitter, Facebook or in the Talkback section at the end of this blog.

Graphic by Andy Tarnoff

Kelly Brough, the President and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, says Milwaukee is at a tipping point culturally.
Kelly Brough, the President and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, says Milwaukee is at a tipping point culturally.
Roy H. Williams from Oklahoma City spoke about the impact an NBA franchise has had on his city.
Roy H. Williams from Oklahoma City spoke about the impact an NBA franchise has had on his city.
Joe Roman of Cleveland sees similarities between his city and Milwaukee.
Joe Roman of Cleveland sees similarities between his city and Milwaukee.

Milwaukee is at its tipping point

The Cultural and Entertainment Capital Needs Task Force hosted a panel Friday morning featuring guests from Denver, Oklahoma City and Cleveland – and while topics such as new arena, transit and taxation were covered – the main takeaway was that these visitors feel Milwaukee is at its tipping point culturally.

Nearly 200 people filed into the Todd Wehr Theater in the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts Center to join chamber of commerce presidents and chief executive officers Roy H. Williams (Oklahoma City), Kelly Brough (Denver) and Joe Roman (Cleveland) for an hour-long discussion about what their cities have done to revitalize and expand their cultural and entertainment districts. It was near the end of the panel when the trio was asked about its perception of Milwaukee that things got really interesting.

After a pause, and some kind words about the foundation provided by the lakefront, the Milwaukee River and Lake Michigan itself, Brough said:

"I think how I look at it is this is it’s in a transition area, and this is the moment where you get to decide, do we tip it? I’d say this is where we were as a city about 20 years ago. Are we going to make the investments and make a run at the things that will tip us to be a city of the world, not a city in the United States."

The three panelists all admitted it’s a long, difficult process with no true blueprint – no "magic formula" – but it requires investments in land, amenities, transit, public space and growing the city’s brand globally.

But, starting that investment now is vital.

"The intensity of the moment is greater than ever," Brough said. "Our history has been one that says just attract that company and we’ll be fine. What we know is, the reality is, that company’s not going to come without the workforce, so you have to do both. And to create the future you want, you have to say what’s it take to get the company and you have to say what’s it take to get the workforce, or keep the workforce…

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The Milwaukee Bucks will have a "different" uniform this coming season - a gold championship tab.
The Milwaukee Bucks will have a "different" uniform this coming season - a gold championship tab. (Photo: @conradburry/Twitter)

Bucks will have a uniform change this year

One of the most anticipated changes Milwaukee Bucks fans hoped for with new owners was some kind of uniform change or alteration. Unfortunately, jerseys for the 2014-15 season were planned long in advance. But, the NBA is doing something unique for the teams that have won championships -- which means there will be a change after all.

Tennessee-based graphic designer Conrad Burry noticed it while flipping through his retailer-only catalog of jerseys for the upcoming season.

It's subtle, but noticeable. He noticed a gold tab on the collar.

ESPN.com reported that the gold tabs "would be the first league-wide championship badge ever used by one of the 'Big Four' North American professional sports leagues, and it is similar to the star system used by soccer teams to denote World Cup titles."

Personally, I love this idea. Championships are hard to come by, and this is a great way to for the NBA to work in a uniform change and honor its past champions.

This opens the door for other ideas, or different ways to acknowledge teams like Chicago, Boston and Los Angeles that have multiple titles. But, one step at a time.

This is especially good timing for the Bucks, who now make sure "championship caliber" is peppered throughout discussions regarding the future the franchise under new co-owners Marc Lasry and Wes Edens.

The owners are doing it right by harkening back to those championship days in the 1970s, and the league did them an unintended solid in deciding to add this to the jerseys.

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